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THE LATEST FROM LISA BERNE

‘Babblings of a Bookworm’ on “Young Jane Austen”

“Beautifully illustrated . . . Very readable and engaging,” says Babblings of a Bookworm about Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer. “I very much enjoyed it.”

Read the full review here.

 

 

All Things Jane Austen celebrates launch of “Young Jane Austen”

All Things Jane Austen celebrates the launch of Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer with an international giveaway that includes an e-book and a signed, print copy of Young Jane Austen, as well as an exquisite sea-glass necklace and matching earrings — custom-designed by Jenna Palmisano Perfetti of Sea Glass Chic and inspired by the seaside in Jane Austen’s life and writing.

Based in the coastal town of Marmora, NJ, Sea Glass Chic offers a unique collection of handcrafted jewelry and home accents, utilizing only natural materials including sterling silver and freshwater pearls. All their sea glass is hand-collected from the eastern coast of the U.S.

 

Lisa Pliscou's Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer and Sea Glass Chic

Photo by Adam Perfetti

 

To enter the giveaway, click here.

To visit Sea Glass Chic on the Web, click here.

Read the Wyatt-MacKenzie press release here.

 

My Jane Austen Book Club features “Young Jane Austen”

Lisa Pliscou and Young Jane Austen are featured on My Jane Austen Book Club, including a post from Lisa called “What Jane Austen Can Teach Us about Creativity, Inspiration and Success.” A signed, print copy of Young Jane Austen is being offered as well; the giveaway runs through April 24, 2015.

 

Click here to read the post, and enter the giveaway.

 

 

Austenesque Reviews on “Young Jane Austen”

“Appealing and handsome,” says Austenesque Reviews. “Young Jane Austen is a thoroughly researched and credible representation of Jane Austen’s life from infancy through age twelve. This lovely, delightful biography is a wonderful choice for all Janeites wanting to learn more about Jane Austen’s childhood.”

Read the full review here.

Austenesque Reviews

“Young Jane Austen” at the New Orleans Jane Austen Society

Lisa Pliscou’s just-published book, Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer, will be featured at the launch party of the New Orleans Jane Austen Society on April 23, 2015, at the Beauregard-Keyes House in New Orleans. Signed, print copies will be available, along with specially created “calling cards.”

“Young Jane Austen” at the JASNA North Texas Spring Tea

Attendees at the sold-out spring tea of the Jane Austen Society of North America, North Texas region, will receive a glimpse of Young Jane Austen via specially created “calling cards,” and will have an opportunity to receive a signed first-edition copy as a prize.

Held at the Adolphus Hotel in Dallas on April 26, 2015, the event includes high tea and a discussion of gentlemen’s Regency wear by period reenactor Brian Cushing.

Regency reenactor Brian Cushing.

Regency reenactor Brian Cushing.

Babblings of a Bookworm features “Young Jane Austen”

Lisa Pliscou and Young Jane Austen are featured on Babblings of a Bookworm, including a post from Lisa about Jane Austen’s exile from home as an infant, and the curious divergence in how her biographers discuss this interval in her life — or don’t mention it at all.

"In the Village" by Massimo Mongiardo in Young Jane Austen by Lisa Pliscou

“In the Village” by Massimo Mongiardo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Babblings of a Bookworm is also sponsoring an international giveaway for a signed, print copy of Young Jane Austen, which runs through April 19, 2015. Click here to read the post, and enter the giveaway.

 

“Young Jane Austen” a Book of the Week at Friday Night Lights

Young Jane Austen is a “Book of the Week” at the Friday Night Lights blog.

“A beautiful book,” praises Jeff Botch. “One of my favorite parts is when Pliscou writes, ‘The family gathered again for dinner, and afterwards Papa would read to his students: it might be a story about strong heroes and strange monsters, or about a poor sailor shipwrecked on a faraway island, or about a brave boy who pulled a sword from a stone and learned he was to be king.’

“This was certainly a time in history when men were looked upon as more important than women, but Jane was smart, curious, and eager to read anything and everything she could get her hands on.

“Just because society may appear to be telling you one thing, you have the opportunity to write your own life. . . . This book can make a difference.”

 

More about Friday Night Lights here.

 

 

 

The Calico Critic features “Young Jane Austen”

Lisa Pliscou and Young Jane Austen are featured on The Calico Critic, including a post from Lisa called “What Jane Read: A Turning Point,” describing a fascinating leap in Austen’s creative development as a child — during which she evolved from being a passive reader to a more critical, responsive one. This was a key step, and an exciting one, on her journey toward becoming a writer.

From the chapter called "Reading." Illustration by Massimo Mongiardo in Lisa Pliscou's "Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer." (Wyatt-MacKenzie Publishing)

From the chapter called “Reading.” Illustration by Massimo Mongiardo.

 

The Calico Critic is also sponsoring a giveaway for a signed, print copy of Young Jane Austen, which runs through April 10, 2015. Click here to read the post, and enter the giveaway.

On “The Making of Gone with the Wind”

For me, one of the great pleasures of visiting the library is perusing the new-book shelves: finding works from favorite authors as well as making interesting discoveries. Recently I happened across The Making of Gone with the Wind, a big, beautiful book, an elegant square, eleven by eleven, weighing in at a hefty five pounds.

I snatched it up, lugged it home, and began eagerly flipping through the pages.

 

The Making of GONE WITH THE WIND

 

I wouldn’t describe myself as a film buff. I’m not obsessed with Gone with the Wind. In fact, I’ll probably never be swayed from my stubborn insistence that Clark Gable’s Rhett Butler is not sexy. And that although Leslie Howard offered a wonderfully sensitive portrayal of Ashley Wilkes, he was just too old for the role.

The Making of Gone with the Wind is a fascinating book. I learned a lot. But my true joy in reading it came from an entirely different source. When I was eleven or twelve, living with my family in a remote agricultural area of southernmost California, Gone with the Wind was shown in the town’s old, shabby movie theater. My mom and I went to see it. She and I never did this sort of thing together, so it was a big deal to me. (I usually went there on the weekends with my friends, watching double features of horror movies that afterwards, I was extremely sorry to have seen.)

On this particular day, I remember where we sat — around the middle, toward the left as we faced the screen — and I remember also the feel of the velvety seat cushion and the hard curve of the old metal seatback. And the companionable feel of Mom, right next to me.

Scarlett — brave, foolish Scarlett. Rhett (not sexy), Ashley (too old so not sexy either), Melanie, Mammy, the Cast of Thousands. Tara, Twelve Oaks, Atlanta (burning). Those dresses, those hats. Love and war. Melanie’s death (yes, I wept). The fantastically ambivalent ending: will she, or won’t she, get Rhett back? I sat transfixed.

Long ago and far away. My mom is gone now; gone with the wind, you might say: her ashes scattered into the ocean. But reading that big, lovely book seemed to bring her close to me, quietly and vividly, for a while. A gift.

 

 

More about The Making of Gone with the Wind here.