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THE LATEST FROM LISA BERNE

Savvy Verse and Wit on “Young Jane Austen”

“Delightful,” says Serena M. Agusto-Cox of Savvy Verse and Wit about Lisa Pliscou’s just-published Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer. An overarching theme in this biography is what makes a writer become a writer? Are they born as such? Does it require simply a fondness for words or an observant nature and does it need to be nurtured just by the individual or by their own support system?”

Read the full review here.

The Loft Literary Center features author Lisa Pliscou

The Loft Literary Center features a guest post by Lisa Pliscou, author of the just-published biography Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer. The post is called “Young Jane Austen: Creativity, Inspiration, Grit.”

 

The Loft Literary Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

To read the post, click here.

 

‘vvb32 reads’ Features “Young Jane Austen”

The ‘vvb32 reads’ blog features a guest post by Lisa Pliscou, author of the just-published biography Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer. The post is “Top 10 Reasons to Read Jane Austen.”

Also featured is a giveaway for a signed, print copy of Young Jane Austen, which is open until June 30, 2015.

vvb32 reads

 

 

 

 

 

 

To read the post, and enter the giveaway, click here.

 

“Young Jane Austen” at New Orleans Jane Austen Society Talk

A signed copy of Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer is being offered as a door prize at a May 27, 2015, event sponsored by the New Orleans Jane Austen Society, the Beauregard-Keyes House, and Bats On Strings in New Orleans, Louisiana. The event includes a talk on women’s role in art in the time of Jane Austen, a cocktail hour, an All Things Jane Austen Pop-Up Shop, and self-guided home tours.

 

logo for the New Orleans Jane Austen Society

 

 

 

 

More about the New Orleans Jane Austen Society here.

More about Young Jane Austen here.

 

“Young Jane Austen” at the Jane Austen High Tea

Signed copies of Lisa Pliscou’s Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer will be offered as prizes at the Jane Austen High Tea, to be held at the Rollin Arts Centre in Port Alberni, Vancouver Island, Canada, on July 3rd and 4th, 2015. Sponsored by the Centennial Belles of Port Alberni, this event includes a classic English high tea, live music, an English country dancing demonstration, a Regency fashion show, and more.

Centennial Belles of Port Alberni

Centennial Belles of Port Alberni

Centennial Belles of Port Alberni

To learn more about Young Jane Austen, click here.

“Young Jane Austen” at the Jane Austen Weekend

Featuring custom-made bookplates, Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer will be available for sale at the Jane Austen Weekend/War of 1812 Bicentennial Event at the Genesee Country Village and Museum on June 13 and 14, 2015, in Mumford, New York. The event includes historical reenactors, a fashion show, dance demonstrations, live music, and more.

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To learn more about the Jane Austen Weekend/War of 1812 Bicentennial event, click here.

More about Young Jane Austen here.

 

Lisa Pliscou to Participate in the Audio Austen Program

On August 5, 2015, Lisa Pliscou will be participating in the Audio Austen program, a newly launched initiative via the Eastern Pennsylvania Region of the Jane Austen Society of North America. She’ll be in conversation about her book Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer, published in April 2015 by Wyatt-MacKenzie.

 

More about the Eastern Pennsylvania Region of JASNA here.

More about Young Jane Austen here.

 

‘More Agreeably Engaged’ Features Lisa Pliscou

Janet of the More Agreeably Engaged blog features Lisa Pliscou and her just-published book Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer. 

“It is undoubtedly one of the prettiest books I have ever seen,” says Janet. “It is in full-color, inside and out. Yes, I did say the inside too. The blue print is so appropriate for the time and looks like fabric that might have been used then. Add to that the look of very old pages and you will see a delightful book that anyone would love to have in their library.”

Lisa has written a guest post about working with artist Massimo Mongiardo and how he created the illustration called “The Dressing Room.”

"The Dressing Room" by Massimo Mongiardo in Lisa Pliscou's "Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer"

Sketch for “The Dressing Room” by Massimo Mongiardo.

 

Janet is also offering an international giveaway for a print copy of Young Jane Austen, which ends May 26, 2015. 

To read the post, and to enter the giveaway, click here.

 

 

‘Reading, Writing, Working, Playing’ on “Young Jane Austen”

Pliscou uses modern psychological thinking to thoughtfully speculate on how Austen might have responded to the few known circumstances of her life as a child, given her later works and words,” says Jane of the Reading, Writing, Working, Playing blog about Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer. “Covering familiar ground but also providing insights into why and how Austen was able to tap vast reservoirs of creativity to become the Austen we know and love.”

Jane is also offering an international giveaway of a print copy of Young Jane Austen, which ends May 24, 2015.

To read the full review, and to enter the giveaway, click here.

Q & A with Friday Night Books

Q. How did you become interested in writing and when did you decide that you wanted to be a writer?

Seems like I’ve always been a writer! When I was five, I wrote and illustrated a little story, and was so very proud when my mom put the pages together and stapled them. Suddenly, I had a book of my own!

I was lucky to grow up in a house filled to the gunnels with books, and so between my love of reading, and an early inclination to express myself through the written word, becoming a writer just sort of . . . happened. A happy circumstance of nature and nurture, I suspect.

Lisa Pliscou: Becoming a writer was a "happy circumstance of nature and nurture, I suspect."

Becoming a writer was a “happy circumstance of nature and nurture, I suspect.”

Q. Who were some of your major influences when you were growing up?

My parents were avid readers, and so that, of course, was a big influence. There were some inspiring teachers and encouraging librarians in my life when I was a kid, and that helped support my passion for reading and writing, too.

And, like Jane Austen did during her childhood, I read pretty much everything I could get my hands on — the good and the bad, the age-appropriate and also books that were well over my head at the time, by authors such as Thomas Wolfe, Sinclair Lewis, Taylor Caldwell, Katherine Anne Porter, and Woody Allen. (I had to catch up with those when I was a teenager, and beyond.)

Q. Young Jane Austen: Becoming a Writer is a fantastic story that details the life of Jane from birth to the time she makes the decision to become a writer. What was the process like for you in researching Jane Austen and ultimately completing such a wonderful book? 

Thank you for the kind words! The research process began very informally, really almost randomly – I happened across a biography of Jane Austen on my library’s new-book shelf and I snatched it up — and then I got so interested in the subject that I launched into a binge-read of other biographies which, in turn, in a snowball sort of way, ended up becoming the research for Young Jane Austen. Before all this, I knew very little about Jane Austen — an appalling lapse for someone who studied English and American Literature and Language in college!

The narrative section in "Young Jane Austen" is a hybrid of fact and fiction.

The narrative section in “Young Jane Austen” is a hybrid of fact and fiction. Illustration by Massimo Mongiardo.

As for completing the manuscript: whenever I start a book, I have a pretty clearly defined sense of where I want to end up, and in this case, I knew I wanted the narrative — a “speculative” hybrid of fact and fiction — to end when Jane is 11 or 12, the point at which most biographies begin to dwell pretty thoroughly on her life.

Q. Do you have any unique rituals or habits that you do prior to sitting down to write?

No, I’m afraid I’m not that original! Like many writers, I’m a morning person, and am dependent on a good strong cup of coffee before I sit down in front of my computer.

Q. How would you describe your writing style?

I write for both children and for adults, so my style tends to vary quite a bit. Sometimes I write using a wild riot of adjectives and adverbs — which is tremendous fun! — and sometimes I write with a very deliberate spareness. Also fun. It’s just different.

This excerpted interview appears with the kind permission of Friday Night Books, where it was originally published.